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. >> democracy is at its best when they all have a seat at the table. but in america there's a big gap. we need more women in office. >> men hold 82% of the seats in the house of representatives. a decade ago, our nation ranked ninth 57 nations as a percentage of women in congress. today we are 92nd. out of 50 governors come just five are women. that's 10%, the same percentage as the number of women mayors in the 100 largest cities. out of more than 7000 state legislators, fewer than one in four are women. that's barely higher than it was two decades ago. at this rate women will be underrepresented in the united states for another 500 years. a century ago in 1920, the decades long struggle for women to win the righ right to vocal e in the 19th amendment to the constitution. inspired by that struggle, representation 2020 takes on this centrist challenge for women. we must have parity for women in office. that will happen when any given election a woman is just as likely as a man to win and in any given legislature, women will be just likely told them. i founded the white house project where we t
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
on booknotes in 1998 to talk about his book "a dream deferred" the second betrayal of black freedom in america. in this collection of essays the author writes about post-civil rights america the liberalism movement that was ultimately more harmful were for racial equality than was helpful. mr. steele says the movement toward equality was less about a true movement towards racial harmony and more about white america's attempt about the decade of segregation. this is about an hour. c-span: shelby steele, author of "a dream deferred." you talk about your father in this book a little bit, talk--say he's a--more of a persuader than an intimidator. what did you mean by that? >> guest: well, literally, he was a--he was a--he liked to talk and he liked to think and he was a very--his approach was to--he wanted people to feel--to identify with his position on things, not just to agree with him, but to--to see the--to--to actually identify with the position. and so, he--he mu--was much more interested in persuading someone to see why he was taking the position that he was taking, than actually making th
to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with income taxes ge
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
to the hospital. twice as much, we and america spend twice as much as the health care system and we can do amazing things for people but i don't believe we are getting our money's where, $2.8 trillion, 18% of our economy. i can't get my head around the number that big. i know what that will buy and for 1% of that, you can buy five of me. there are only 15 primary care in camden and all getting boarded up. we have to reinvest the money on the front line of care rather than building more hospitals and expanding emergency rooms, and at incredibly high price if you cut in that and hospitalize and we set a lower price if you talk to people and the market has responded, if you look at every major city those cranes that are above buildings building new lanes and expanding hospitals, if you overpay you will get too much and if we get a bubble of hospital beds and technical capacity of specialists, and we will destroy the other part of the market. and decent primary-care. the most in expensive patients in camden have $3.5 million in receipts, go to 18% of patients and 90% of costs. we ignore 1% of patients
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
to corporate america about that one. maybe 75 days, two or three quarters max. but we make the long-term projections and in this the short term projection. one huge question i have that a lot of us had is the uncertainty just in the out years? we all know there's a huge amount of uncertainty about tomorrow. we're willing to go tomorrow? where will interest rates go tomorrow? based on what ben bernanke says or any other number of people. there could be an awful lot of fluctuation that can happen in the very near term. we saw earlier today would have been in the stock market over a brief period of time i think on jim's slide hitting it so we do not in our models in the deterministic models have that much enormous deflection in the near term. we have more deflection in the long term. but there's one other aspect of it. our stochastic model evin is based on having the individual parameters flecha bate around the extent to which the year to year fluctuations are in the past. we don't have built in either perimeter of certainty or what we sort of think of as the sort of central tendency v
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
of patients using drivingy rooms in america are utilization. at the medicaid -- you leave a message no one calls you back. there are no appointment available. that's before the expansion. it's going get even worse as time goes forward. it's mapping out the claims on a map five years of data mapping out the home address of every resident and this is only nine square miles a small community. 6% of the city blocks are 10% of the line mass, 18% of the patients, 27% of the visits and 37% of the cost. it's just theroom room and hospital care. all over america they are living collected in buildings. many of which you are funding through state funds and federal funds. these are the two most expensive in the city. these are beautiful buildings with great management. 600 parents who are mostly dual eligible. these are disabled seniorsed at $12 million in payment for the care to go bark over and over to the hospital. the building at the bottom. 300 patients a nursing home 300 patients had 15 million in payment to got hospital. we have mapped out data all over the cub now and found the same pattern
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
in that he believed that business in america should serve some point. there should be an and the business. it didn't message you have to have a broad social and that there should be some point to it, which automatically testing wishes and for most of our business folks from today. he had kind of an enlightened sense of what this is journalism could be about. >> he didn't mind criticism of business. >> that's right. let's face it, when it's 1933 and its 1934, it's kind of hard to defend business. he had a henry hoover conception of heroic business, but in the early part of the depression it was almost impossible for any honest person to continue to take that line. so fortune and its writers including agee begin to confront some of the more unseemly side of the country. so fortune ran pieces about -- they ran a piece about the tennessee valley authority, which agee wrote and which luce told him was told there was one of the best things i've ever been printed since fortune had been around. so they were brought and pragmatically open to new deal reforms. and i keep mentioning dwight macdonald
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13